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Engine calendar time limit (TBO) mandatory for DTO or rental use?

Quick question.
Lycoming allows exceeding the 12 year calendar TBO, in accordance with their procedures to check the engine for excessive wear and corrosion.

Is it allowed on a plane that is used by a DTO and for rental?

THX

Belgium

Yes, if the DTO is non-commercial.

Sweden, Sweden

A non commercial DTO will go bust Or is there a definition e.g. an aeroclub incorporated as a registered charity, or a sporting organisation?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Are you in a CAMO ?

I’m out of a CAMO, and I rent my aircraft for private flights only, with the engine being past the 12 years TBO.

If the 12 year/2000hours value is not an airworthiness limitation but rather published through a service information/letter/bulletin then compliance with those is optional under ML / NCO (private, non commercial use). One may include TBO recommendations in the AMP, however it’s not mandatory.

The engine can be operated indefinitely, and the owner bears the responsibility. In practice, one would obviously do compression tests, oil analysis and boroscope inspections to assess the engine on condition.

There are some exceptions within ML / NCO:

In a „for profit open to the public DTO/ATO“, the aircraft must be in a controlled environment = CAO/CAMO. Adherence to manufacturer recommendations is then subject to the CAO/CAMO which approves the AMP.

Airline/Mentor/Safety/Instructor - Pilot
Based Austria | Operating Worldwide

Peter wrote:

A non commercial DTO will go bust Or is there a definition e.g. an aeroclub incorporated as a registered charity, or a sporting organisation?

As you use to say, we’ve done this before. “Non-commercial” means that it is not operating to generate a profit outside of the organisation itself (e.g. to shareholders).

What exactly this means would depend on the legislation and practises in various countries. I would guess that a registered charity in the UK would be non-profit. In Sweden there is the concept of “idealistic association for the public good” (it sounds better in Swedish), where you find e.g. charities, sport clubs and – yes – flying clubs.

Last Edited by Airborne_Again at 16 Oct 09:18
ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

Adherence to manufacturer recommendations is then subject to the CAO/CAMO which approves the AMP.

Before I left the CAMO, they actually accepted to go beyond the TBO calendar limit and this was approved in the AMP. At that time (when enrolled in the controlled environnement), I also was allowed to rent my aircraft to commercial ATO.

Under PartM, DGAC has provided for ages an alternative protocol of control for piston engines, called the G-40-01. As snoopy says, it is a standard way of analyzing engine health via compressions, oil analysis, oil consumption monitoring, boroscope inspection…
Under PartML, you can imitate this protocol, under your own responsibility, or under CAMO’s responsability.

Last Edited by PetitCessnaVoyageur at 16 Oct 11:09

So it IS allowed then? Depending on your interpretation

Belgium

Depends on if your CAA calls your DTO commercial or not.

Sweden, Sweden

Yeah… who decides this?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom
19 Posts
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