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Pilot dies... A lesson here?

This is a sad story. Now people can drop down dead anywhere, and the silver lining here is that it happened whilst on the ground and therefore limited further collateral.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/pilot-taxiing-takeoff-northern-colorado-214025299.html

A medical is like a car MOT. Valid for the 30 minutes you saw the doc. After that we all self assess. There are times I have gone flying when I was perhaps not feeling that great. Many more times I called off. As i get older I think it becomes more pertinent to assess and self declare.

Fly safe. I want this thing to land l...
EGPF Glasgow

NOT giving my data to Yahoo. I’ll wait for some other source.

Maoraigh
EGPE, United Kingdom

Well, at least it is a documented incident.

https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/273748

http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2022/01/pilatus-pc-1245-n601ht-fatal-accident.html

Last Edited by Mooney_Driver at 14 Jan 23:03
LSZH, Switzerland

I have always found the medical slightly amusing, at least in the UK.
Usually a deaf and blind soon-to-retire doctor that I wouldn’t trust to drive my family to Tesco, milling around with minimal effort to ensure I pass the exam, so he can realise me of my money in the least possible time. It’s a joke.

The MOT is what I get from BUPA every year where they have actual doctors making actual examinations and actually caring. Much cheaper as well, as it happens.

EGTR

@mmgreve my three AMEs in the UK have been quite fit and hearty, and very experienced and pragmatic. Two were/are RAF and I don’t think they pencil whip the process. The cost of UK medicals is getting higher every year, probably above inflation!

I only renew my FAA First Class once a year as am not flying commercial N-reg just Part 91, and I don’t notice the FAA First Class has any extra tests.

Am I correct on this incident the PIC just held a class three?

Oxford (EGTK)

I’m still puzzled by the title of this thread. What lesson I take from this? That any of us might drop dead on the spot at any time? Already knew that. That the pilot flying my plane might drop dead on the spot at any time? Already knew that, too.

@RobertL18C: why do you do first class if you only fly Part 91 (without paying pax I assume)? iirc first class has an EKG which second/third class don’t. So maybe it’s not a bad idea to get one done on the back of your medical, without having to see a cardiologist which could cause problems with the FAA.

afaik there is no difference at all between second and third class except which box they tick. But a second class is only good for one year whereas third class is good for 2 or 5, depending on age. But the second transmutes itself into a third after one year anyway.

LFMD, France

mmgreve wrote:

I have always found the medical slightly amusing, at least in the UK.
Usually a deaf and blind soon-to-retire doctor that I wouldn’t trust to drive my family to Tesco, milling around with minimal effort to ensure I pass the exam, so he can realise me of my money in the least possible time. It’s a joke.

I think you’ve had bad (or maybe good?) luck. I’ve had three different AMEs since as started flying in 1983 and they’ve all been quite thorough. (I have a class 2 medical.) One sent me to an eye specialist when he thought he saw the onset of glaucoma in one of my eyes. (Fortunately it was a false alarm.)

Last Edited by Airborne_Again at 15 Jan 09:47
ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

johnh wrote:

iirc first class has an EKG which second/third class don’t.

Don’t know about the FAA, but for EASA class 2 medicals you need an ECG at age 40 and then biannually after age 50.

By the way, how does the FAA 1/2/3 class medicals correspond to the ICAO 1/2 class medicals? (The ICAO class 3 medical is for ATCOs and UAV operators.)

Last Edited by Airborne_Again at 15 Jan 09:52
ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

mmgreve wrote:

I have always found the medical slightly amusing, at least in the UK.
Usually a deaf and blind soon-to-retire doctor that I wouldn’t trust to drive my family to Tesco, milling around with minimal effort to ensure I pass the exam, so he can realise me of my money in the least possible time. It’s a joke.

Not here, not even shortly. Medicals (Class 2) usually take the better part of one hour, include EKG every 2 years, hearing tests, sight tests, blood test and quite a strict physical exam. If they see anything they don’t like, it’s off to the specialists. Many people dread their medicals every year and do their last pre-medical flight as if it was their last. I think in this country, lost medicals are one of the prime reasons people are stopped from flying. 50 up, all bets are off.

I now have a very good AME or rather two which work together, so I look at the medical also as something which might safe my life outside flying one day. But there are others where medicals are a very frustrating experience. Thank goodness we have the choice.

LSZH, Switzerland

johnh wrote:

I’m still puzzled by the title of this thread. What lesson I take from this?

@johnh

The lesson should be be very aware of your own body and what it tells you. Do not rely on ’’doctors’’, nor a medical so therefore presume I am fit.

I also agree that the annual AME led medical is a bit of a joke. My AME, who was also my GP, basically used my held date to sign the CAA forms. Then charged me.

The most important bit of any medical is BP/PULSE/ECG. How is my heart doing particularly under stress and anxiety. The ability to read and assess the ECG result is key. Self maintenance as with your aircraft is the message. I see guys all the time with Stage 1 hypertension, high blood pressure. I ask what have you done. My GP gives me a pill. Standard practice. But your BP is still high. Oh, I take a pill. Time for another discussion.

Last Edited by BeechBaby at 15 Jan 10:54
Fly safe. I want this thing to land l...
EGPF Glasgow
23 Posts
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