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First ??? all electric plane down in Hungary

Today at around 10AM local time, all electric Magnus eFusion went down shortly after take-off in Hungarian Pecs, LHPP, killing two. Is this a first all electric aircraft accident with fatalities?

Aircraft registration HA-XEF, being developed by Hungarian based Magnus Aircraft together with Siemens.

More information here: Aviation Safety Network

LKHK, Czech Republic

Amazing there was a fire, but I suppose when you puncture lithium batteries, they will go off pretty quick.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Does anyone on here know if electric aircraft, like this one, are using the ‘soft pouch’ type of lithium cells as used in model aircraft, or the sealed can types used in cars? Eg., This, vs.

This

(Note the re-assuring brand name on these cells).

EGBW / KPRC, United Kingdom

You are not allowed to use a soft case for Lithium batteries on aircraft. They have to be enclosed in a sealed case, let’s say, aluminium etc..
With a hard impact like from 500-1000ft I will assume even the case will be destroyed

LMML

I think that airplane is a hybrid actually. Diesel + electric.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

Aveling wrote:

the ‘soft pouch’ type of lithium cells as used in model aircraft, or the sealed can types used in cars
Only Tesla is using cylindrical cells. Every other car maker uses pouch cells, either as individual pouches or grouping a couple inside a roughly prismatic, usually aluminium, can. A number of these together will build a module, and a number of modules will build a pack.
Physical crash-worthiness is most often at the pack level. Given enough violence anything will give, once the shell is broken the cells are vulnerable, regardless of format.

ESMK, Sweden

LeSving wrote:

I think that airplane is a hybrid actually. Diesel + electric.

This was all electric airplane, no hybrid, see picture bellow.

LKHK, Czech Republic

Pytlak wrote:

This was all electric airplane, no hybrid, see picture bellow.

Maybe, maybe not. The airplane is a test bed for different propulsion systems. It could be this one:

Anyone know for sure which propulsion system the aircraft actually had?

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

Would the accident be unconnected to the engine type?

Maoraigh
EGPE, United Kingdom

Indeed Maoraigh, no sense speculating that the power plant is to blame.

Three of these have been built, HA-XEI and HA-XEF being fully electric and the third one (HA-XE..) is the hybrid one. XEF crashed.

Private field, Mallorca, Spain
14 Posts
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