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Cessna Citation II OE-FGR down in the Baltic sea.

A Citation II, registration OE-FGR, has crashed in the Baltic Sea after being unresponsive on radio for a prolonged period of time. The flight originated from Jerez in Spain with destination Cologne-Bonn. The aircraft climbed to FL360 and followed it’s flight plan, ATC was not able to reach it. It overflew the destination and continued over Germany until it apparently ran out of fuel over the East Sea.

German Airforce planes were dispatched to intercept the aircraft before it went down but could not see anyone in the flight deck.

Some sources claim the flight reported problems with it’s pressurisation before becoming silent. Given the further events, this appears probable.

Accidents like this involving loss of pressure have happened in the past, the most prominent one being the Helios 737 over Greece but also a TBM900 over Florida and a Learjet over the US involving a famous golfer.

https://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20220904-0

Last Edited by Mooney_Driver at 04 Sep 19:38
LSZH, Switzerland

The pilot was confirmed to be a German businessman caller Karl-Peter Griesemann.

Low-hours pilot
EDVM Hildesheim, Germany

Sad to hear.

Sad accident in which a whole family perished. The father was the pilot flying, along was his wife, his daughter and her husband (plus 2 dogs). Apparently the owner/pilot was also the owner of a charter and ambulance flight business in Germany, which operates on an AOC.

Sad also to read comments in various platforms about the safety of SP ops of jets, 70+pilots and owner/operators. Sometimes other pilots with a grudge are really GA’s worst enemies.

LSZH, Switzerland

Sad also to read comments in various platforms about the safety of SP ops of jets, 70+pilots and owner/operators.

10 minutes on Kathryn‘s report and it’s evident there‘s some basis for these comments.

always learning
LO__, Austria

Elsewhere it’s stated (in separate posts) that his daughter and his wife had pilot licenses.

Maoraigh
EGPE, United Kingdom

Would they have had CJ type ratings, or just PPLs?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

Would they have had CJ type ratings, or just PPLs?

Unknown but they certainly would have known the airplane, as it was the family airplane. And after all, a Citation is not that difficult to fly. And most pilots who are around a plane like that on a regular basis also know what happens in case of pressurisation problems, get the darn thing down.

The pilot is said to have had 50 years of flying experience. Even if that does not mean lots of proficiency (he apparently just regained his medical a short time ago) he knew that airplane well. Looking at similar accidents with 2 cockpit crew, the SP discussion is in most cases just sour grapes. The way this looks, my bet is on a defective or contaminated oxygen system. Putting on the mask, thinking “I’m safe now” when you’re not and you are out of time at these altitudes before you can even start a descent.

The Helios case proves that pressurisation failures are amongst the most deadly, so do several others like the Lear Jet which killed Payne Stewart or the TBM which killed a then AOPA rep (actually the first 900 ever delivered if I recall right)

LSZH, Switzerland

Just read some newspaper article about it. It does sound like a loss of pressurisation and then the failure of a pilot to get the mask on in the few tens of seconds, or there was no gas in the cylinder.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Would they have had CJ type ratings, or just PPLs?

Flying a OE- reg jet requires at least PPL, HPA and type rating.

always learning
LO__, Austria
43 Posts
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